Edible Bath Tub Paint

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Bath time has always been my favorite part of the day with Jaxon. It is so calm, relaxing, and the perfect segway into bedtime at our home.

Jaxon had his first bath ever at only 3 weeks old (when his umbilical cord fell off) and has literally had one every single night since. He LOVES bath time and having his boujee-baby hair dried with a blow dryer after.

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Because bath time is such a staple in our routine, I am always looking for ways to make it more fun! And by far the most fun we have had is with this edible bathtub paint that is baby safe and cleans up with ease!

This recipe only requires 3 simple ingredients (unless you want to make it all natural, which I’ll touch on in a minute!).

What you’ll need:

  • 3-5 small containers (depending on how many colors you want)
  • 1 cup infant cereal
  • 1/2 cup water
  • food coloring
  • paint brushes (but fingers work just as well!)

Instructions:

  1. Combine the water and infant cereal in a large bowl and mix until there are no clumps.
  2. Separate into the desired number of containers. Add 2-3 drops of food color and mix until completely blended.

That’s it! So simple, right?

Natural Food Coloring

After giving Jaxon some children’s Motrin for teething pain, we quickly realized that Jax is allergic to red food coloring just like I am. That was a super fun night of screaming and vomiting…..

Which is why he only had yellow, blue and green bathtub paint however after this activity I started looking into other methods of coloring his bathtub paint.

Check out this all natural color palate!

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According to Glamour.com, “whole foods are loaded with natural pigments. By pureeing a tiny bit of, say, blueberries and mixing with a little water (strain if you like), you get blue/purple. Do the same with spinach, and you have green! Carrots give you orange, and red cabbage makes the most beautiful shade of lavender.”

If you to choose to go the all natural way with your food coloring, the recipe changes just a bit!

Side Note: I do NOT recommend using coffee or grenade to color it because of obvious reasons. I do NOT recommend saffron, lemon, or turmeric for children that have never been exposed to these before.

Recipe with Natural Coloring

  1.  Create your natural food colorings.
  2. Add color to the flour BEFORE adding water
  3. Add water 1tablespoon at a time until it reaches a “paint-like” consistency

The reason you want to add the natural color FIRST is that fruits and veggies have water in them naturally and that will water down the paint and make it too runny if it is added after the water. This method takes a little more time but can be stored in the refrigerator inside an air-tight container for 7 days!

Have fun and keep snacking! 🙂

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**The author of this site encourages you to consult a doctor before making any health changes, especially any changes related to a specific diagnosis or condition. No information on this site should be relied upon to determine diet, make a medical diagnosis, or determine treatment for a medical condition. The information on this website is not intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified health care professional and is not intended as medical advice. For more information please read our full disclaimer here.

Published by snackswithjax

Sarah is the creator and mom behind "Snacks with Jax", a social media community of over 85,000 parents/caregivers, where she shares her son's meals, nutrition information, and evidence-based tips for feeding children. She is a Certified Health Education Specialist with a Bachelor's degree in Nutrition emphasizing in Wellness from Texas Woman's University and years of experience as a culinary instructor working with ages 2+. She has coached hundreds of parents & caregivers through the journey introducing solids to babies and also navigating picky eating with toddlers and older children. Her focus is on establishing a life-long healthy relationship with food for children while also empowering, encouraging, and educating their adult caregivers.

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